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From crucial shots missed to embarrassing falls, the sport of bowling is full of epic disasters on the national stage.  We've compiled a few of the sport's most inconceivable and heartbreaking moments.

 

Dell Ballard Jr.



It's one of the most dramatic bowling mistakes in televised history.  In 1991, Del Ballard Jr. had PBA legend Pete Weber on the ropes going into the last shot of the tournament.  With only 7 pins needed for victory, the championship was seemingly secure until the unthinkable happened.

 

While this was a stunning upset for the PBA star, Del bounced back just weeks later to win the Long Island Open, defeating Jim Johnson Jr.

 
Randy Pedersen



1995 probably was not the best year for Randy Pedersen.  Riding high with seven title match victories against lower-seeded opponents, Randy was favored to win against Ernie Schlegel.  With the PBA Touring Player's Championship on the line, Randy needed a strike and six pins to win (and in that order).  What follows is one of the most dramatic finishes in PBA history (and one of the most famous rants by Ernie Schlegel).

 

Josh Blanchard



24 year-old Josh Blanchard didn't see this one coming. Just before his national television debut at the PBA World Championship Qualifier in Las Vegas, Blanchard had to purchase and drill a new bowling ball for the match.  As the tournament got underway, Blanchard quickly fell behind. In one of his last attempts to rally into contention, Blanchard went from potential runner-up to YouTube sensation.

 

Pete Weber



As one of bowling's biggest legends, Pete Weber has had his fair share of awkward moments on camera.  In this clip, Pete just won the 1991 U.S. Open on national television.  After the interview, Weber was all too happy to lift his trophy in the air as the show closed out. What happens next will live forever in bowling infamy.

 

More Bad Breaks and Bowling Mistakes



To play us out, this compilation of near successes, bad breaks and heartaches lets us all know that even the best bowlers fall a little short sometimes.  After all, bowling's a sport of ups and downs.

 

 

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